Fuzz : when nature breaks the law / Mary Roach.

By: Roach, MaryMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York, N.Y. : W.W. Norton & Company, [2021]Edition: First editionDescription: 308 pages : illustrations ; 22 cmContent type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781324001935 :Subject(s): Human-animal relationships | Animals and civilization | Animal behavior | Wildlife management
Contents:
Maul cops : crime scene forensics when the killer isn't human -- Breaking and entering and eating : how do you handle a hungry bear? -- The elephant in the room : manslaughter by the pound -- A spot of trouble : what makes a leopard a man-eater? -- The monkey fix : birth control for marauding macaques -- Mercurial cougars : how do you count what you can't see? -- When the wood comes down : beware the "danger tree" -- The terror beans : the legume as accomplice to murder -- Okay, boomer : futile military actions against birds -- On the road again : jaywalking with the animals -- To scare a thief : the esoteric art of the frightening device -- The gulls of St. Peter's : the Vatican tries a laser -- The Jesuit and the rat : wildlife management tips from the Pontifical Academy for Life -- Killing with kindness : who cares about a pest? -- The disappearing mouse : the scary magic of gene drives.
Summary: "Join 'America's funniest science writer' ... Mary Roach on an irresistible investigation into the unpredictable world where wildlife and humans meet. What's to be done about a jaywalking moose? A grizzly bear caught breaking and entering? A murderous tree? As ... author Mary Roach discovers, the answers are best found not in jurisprudence but in science: the curious science of human-wildlife conflict, a discipline at the crossroads of human behavior and wildlife biology. Roach tags along with animal attack forensics investigators, human-elephant conflict specialists, bear managers, and 'danger tree' faller-blasters. She travels from leopard-terrorized hamlets in the Indian Himalaya to St. Peter's Square in the early hours before the Pope arrives for Easter Mass, when vandal gulls swoop in to destroy the elaborate floral display. Along the way, Roach reveals as much about humanity as about nature's lawbreakers. Combining little-known forensic science and conservation genetics with a motley cast of laser scarecrows, langur impersonators, and mugging macaques, Fuzz offers hope for compassionate coexistence in our ever-expanding human habitat"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: New Adult Nonfiction
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Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Non-Fiction New Books 591.5 ROA Checked out 10/08/2021 36748002496281
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

One of Bookpage 's Most Anticipated Nonfiction Books of 2021

Join "America's funniest science writer" (Peter Carlson, Washington Post ), Mary Roach, on an irresistible investigation into the unpredictable world where wildlife and humans meet.

What's to be done about a jaywalking moose? A bear caught breaking and entering? A murderous tree? Three hundred years ago, animals that broke the law would be assigned legal representation and put on trial. These days, as New York Times best-selling author Mary Roach discovers, the answers are best found not in jurisprudence but in science: the curious science of human-wildlife conflict, a discipline at the crossroads of human behavior and wildlife biology.

Roach tags along with animal-attack forensics investigators, human-elephant conflict specialists, bear managers, and "danger tree" faller blasters. Intrepid as ever, she travels from leopard-terrorized hamlets in the Indian Himalaya to St. Peter's Square in the early hours before the pope arrives for Easter Mass, when vandal gulls swoop in to destroy the elaborate floral display. She taste-tests rat bait, learns how to install a vulture effigy, and gets mugged by a macaque.

Combining little-known forensic science and conservation genetics with a motley cast of laser scarecrows, langur impersonators, and trespassing squirrels, Roach reveals as much about humanity as about nature's lawbreakers. When it comes to "problem" wildlife, she finds, humans are more often the problem--and the solution. Fascinating, witty, and humane, Fuzz offers hope for compassionate coexistence in our ever-expanding human habitat.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 299-308).

Maul cops : crime scene forensics when the killer isn't human -- Breaking and entering and eating : how do you handle a hungry bear? -- The elephant in the room : manslaughter by the pound -- A spot of trouble : what makes a leopard a man-eater? -- The monkey fix : birth control for marauding macaques -- Mercurial cougars : how do you count what you can't see? -- When the wood comes down : beware the "danger tree" -- The terror beans : the legume as accomplice to murder -- Okay, boomer : futile military actions against birds -- On the road again : jaywalking with the animals -- To scare a thief : the esoteric art of the frightening device -- The gulls of St. Peter's : the Vatican tries a laser -- The Jesuit and the rat : wildlife management tips from the Pontifical Academy for Life -- Killing with kindness : who cares about a pest? -- The disappearing mouse : the scary magic of gene drives.

"Join 'America's funniest science writer' ... Mary Roach on an irresistible investigation into the unpredictable world where wildlife and humans meet. What's to be done about a jaywalking moose? A grizzly bear caught breaking and entering? A murderous tree? As ... author Mary Roach discovers, the answers are best found not in jurisprudence but in science: the curious science of human-wildlife conflict, a discipline at the crossroads of human behavior and wildlife biology. Roach tags along with animal attack forensics investigators, human-elephant conflict specialists, bear managers, and 'danger tree' faller-blasters. She travels from leopard-terrorized hamlets in the Indian Himalaya to St. Peter's Square in the early hours before the Pope arrives for Easter Mass, when vandal gulls swoop in to destroy the elaborate floral display. Along the way, Roach reveals as much about humanity as about nature's lawbreakers. Combining little-known forensic science and conservation genetics with a motley cast of laser scarecrows, langur impersonators, and mugging macaques, Fuzz offers hope for compassionate coexistence in our ever-expanding human habitat"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

Tracing the line between wildlife and the law, the acclaimed science writer examines how humans interact with the natural world. "What is the proper course when wild animals break laws intended for people?" So asks Roach in a book that, in the author's characteristic style, ranges widely, from wild animal attacks to the inherent dangers of certain plants to ways in which we have treated animals that most humans consider vermin. The author begins by examining "the intractable nature of human-wildlife conflict--as it is known today by those who grapple with it professionally." Roach discusses well-known conflicts such as bear attacks before moving on to an account of her visit to a tea plantation in West Bengal, India, "a place where 'the elephant in the room' is not a metaphor." As in her previous bestsellers such as Grunt and Stiff, the author has clearly done her homework, speaking to professionals across a variety of disciplines, including members of the military; nuns, priests, guards, and other workers at the Vatican; and those with job titles that sound "like something you'd hear if you asked an animal-besotted ten-year-old, What do you want to be when you grow up?" (The lucky fellow in question, who has a doctorate in wildlife biology, researches mountain lions and gray wolves, two apex predators.) Traveling from a bear seminar in Reno to a bird-infested island in the Pacific that plagued the American military during World War II, among many other venues, Roach joyfully explores how human culture and wildlife, including plant life, have either found ways to coexist or are constantly at odds. Throughout, Roach highlights people who are genuinely passionate about the work, and she also includes suggestions for readers on how to deal ethically (and effectively) with their own wildlife issues, wherever they live. From the terrifying to the frustrating, a great starting point for understanding the animal world. Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
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