Cat tale : the wild, weird battle to save the Florida panther / Craig Pittman.

By: Pittman, Craig
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Toronto, Ontario : Hanover Square Press, [2020]Description: 336 pages, 16 pages of unnumbered plates : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 24 cmISBN: 9781335938800 :; 133593880XSubject(s): Florida panther -- Conservation | Wildlife conservation -- Florida | Endangered species -- FloridaDDC classification: 599.7524 Summary: "It wasn't so long ago when a lot of people thought the Florida panther was extinct. They were very nearly right. That the panther still exists at all is a miracle - the result of a desperate experiment that led to the most remarkable comeback in the history of the Endangered Species Act. And no one has told the whole story - until now. With novelistic detail and an eye for the absurd, Craig Pittman recounts the extraordinary story of the people who brought the panther back from the brink of extinction, the ones who nearly pushed the species over the edge, and the cats that were caught in the middle."--Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: New Popular Science Books | New Adult Nonfiction
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Non-Fiction New Books 599.7524 PIT Checked out 08/25/2020 36748002467340
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"Witty and passionate." --Lauren Groff<br> <br> "Craig Pittman has a remarkable talent for telling stories set in the Sunshine State that never fail to fascinate and entertain."--Gilbert King<br> <br> "The definitive book on one of America's least understood apex predators. The story of how Florida's panthers were saved from extinction is one that both deserves and needs to be told." --Dane Huckelbridge<br> <br> It wasn't so long ago when a lot of people thought the Florida panther was extinct. They were very nearly right. That the panther still exists at all is a miracle--the result of a desperate experiment that led to the most remarkable comeback in the history of the Endangered Species Act. And no one has told the whole story--until now.<br> <br> With novelistic detail and an eye for the absurd, Craig Pittman recounts the extraordinary story of the people who brought the panther back from the brink of extinction, the ones who nearly pushed the species over the edge, and the cats that were caught in the middle. This being Florida, there's more than a little weirdness, too.<br> <br> An engrossing narrative of wry humor, sharp writing and exhaustive reportage, Cat Tale shows what it takes to bring one species back and what unexpected costs such a decision brings.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"It wasn't so long ago when a lot of people thought the Florida panther was extinct. They were very nearly right. That the panther still exists at all is a miracle - the result of a desperate experiment that led to the most remarkable comeback in the history of the Endangered Species Act. And no one has told the whole story - until now. With novelistic detail and an eye for the absurd, Craig Pittman recounts the extraordinary story of the people who brought the panther back from the brink of extinction, the ones who nearly pushed the species over the edge, and the cats that were caught in the middle."--Provided by publisher.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Prologue: Cat Under Glass (p. 11)
  • Chapter 1 The Cat of God (p. 20)
  • Chapter 2 Pantherland (p. 34)
  • Chapter 3 The Hunter (p. 44)
  • Chapter 4 The State Animal (p. 57)
  • Chapter 5 Mouth to Mouth (p. 73)
  • Chapter 6 The Turbo-Vet (p. 82)
  • Chapter 7 The New Mr. Panther (p. 96)
  • Chapter 8 Medicine Man (p. 105)
  • Chapter 9 Bottleneck (p. 120)
  • Chapter 10 "Extinction Is God's Plan" (p. 128)
  • Chapter 11 The Vortex (p. 137)
  • Chapter 12 The Captives (p. 150)
  • Chapter 13 Hail Mary (p. 158)
  • Chapter 14 "Florida Will Be Developed" (p. 172)
  • Chapter 15 Mr. Influential (p. 190)
  • Chapter 16 The Showdown (p. 202)
  • Chapter 17 The Verdict (p. 223)
  • Chapter 18 The Whistleblower (p. 238)
  • Chapter 19 The Skunk Ape's Scapegoat (p. 248)
  • Chapter 20 The Wanderers (p. 266)
  • Chapter 21 Cat Cam Bingo (p. 278)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 291)
  • A Select Bibliography (p. 293)
  • Notes on Sources (p. 295)
  • Index (p. 325)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

How Florida's panthers were saved from extinction.Sleek and elusive, panthers once roamed across North America, and Native people considered them spiritual beings. By the mid-1990s, in South Florida, fewer than 30 of the wild, solitary animals survived, sustained by marshes and other habitats that withstood the onslaught of suburbs, shopping centers, and other human development. Pittman (Oh, Florida!: How America's Weirdest State Influences the Rest of the Country, 2016, etc.) has been covering these predatorsthe state's official animalfor 20 years at the Tampa Bay Times, where he is an award-winning reporter. In this lively, funny, detailed account of the Florida panther's brush with oblivion and the madcap human efforts to rescue it, the author writes as an authority on both the animals and the uniquely Floridian men and women who have decided their fate. The humans are drawn out of Florida central casting. They include a wealthy playboy/scientist, a retired showman, a Santa Claus look-alike biochemist, and two former Detroit bootleggers. One biologist, known as "Dr. Panther," threw things off with flawed habitat research; a wildlife biologist's whistleblower suit corrected that. Veterinarian Melody Roelke's use of an electro-ejaculator to collect panther semen revealed the panthers' low genetic diversity. Drawing on dozens of interviews, Pittman weaves together stories of panther hunts, court cases, scientific rivalries, and political mischief to describe the activities of humans while panthers were being run over regularly in highway traffic. Experts argued over ways to help the cats; wildlife officials kept approving expanding development in prime panther habitat, such as the town of Ave Maria, brainchild of the founder of Domino's Pizza. Pittman clearly traces important events, from failed efforts at captive breeding to the introduction of eight female Texas cougars to reinvigorate the panther gene pool and mitigate inbreeding problems. As a result, the panther population has grown to more than 200 today.A bright, intriguing story of people and panthers with strong appeal for readers interested in endangered species. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
Phillipsburg Free Public Library
200 Broubalow Way
Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
(908)-454-3712
www.pburglib.org

Powered by Koha