Stamped from the beginning : the definitive history of racist ideas in America / Ibram X. Kendi.

By: Kendi, Ibram X
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Nation Books, ©2016Description: viii, 583 pages ; 25 cmISBN: 9781568585987 :; 1568585985Other title: Definitive history of racist ideas in AmericaSubject(s): Racism -- United States -- History | United States -- Race relationsGenre/Form: Biographies.Summary: Americans like to insist that we are living in a postracial, color-blind society. In fact, racist thought is alive and well; it has simply become more sophisticated and more insidious. And as historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas in this country have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit. Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the lives of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading proslavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. As Kendi provocatively illustrates, racist thinking did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Racist ideas were created and popularized in an effort to defend deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and to rationalize the nation's racial inequities in everything from wealth to health. While racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited--From publisher's website.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Non-Fiction New Books 305.800973 KEN Available pap.ed. 36748002467571
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society. <br> <br> Some Americans insist that we're living in a post-racial society. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America -- it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit.<br> <br> In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis.<br> <br> As Kendi shows, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. They were created to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial inequities.<br> <br> In shedding light on this history, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose racist thinking. In the process, he gives us reason to hope.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 516-561) and index.

Americans like to insist that we are living in a postracial, color-blind society. In fact, racist thought is alive and well; it has simply become more sophisticated and more insidious. And as historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, racist ideas in this country have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit. Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the lives of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading proslavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. As Kendi provocatively illustrates, racist thinking did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Racist ideas were created and popularized in an effort to defend deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and to rationalize the nation's racial inequities in everything from wealth to health. While racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited--From publisher's website.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface to the Paperback Edition (p. ix)
  • Prologue (p. 1)
  • Part I
  • 1 Human Hierarchy (p. 15)
  • 2 Origins of Racist Ideas (p. 22)
  • 3 Coming to America (p. 31)
  • 4 Saving Souls, Not Bodies (p. 47)
  • 5 Black Hunts (p. 58)
  • 6 Great Awakening (p. 66)
  • Part II Thomas Jefferson
  • 7 Enlightenment (p. 79)
  • 8 Black Exhibits (p. 92)
  • 9 Created Equal (p. 104)
  • 10 Uplift Suasion (p. 120)
  • 11 Big Bottoms (p. 135)
  • 12 Colonization (p. 143)
  • Part III
  • 13 Gradual Equality (p. 161)
  • 14 Imbruted or Civilized (p. 177)
  • 15 Soul (p. 191)
  • 16 The Impending Crisis (p. 202)
  • 17 History's Emancipator (p. 214)
  • 18 Ready for Freedom? (p. 223)
  • 19 Reconstructing Slavery (p. 235)
  • 20 Reconstructing Blame (p. 248)
  • Part IV W. E. B. Du Bois
  • 21 Renewing the South (p. 263)
  • 22 Southern Horrors (p. 269)
  • 23 Black Judases (p. 280)
  • 24 Great White Hopes (p. 295)
  • 25 The Birth of a Nation (p. 308)
  • 26 Media Suasion (p. 323)
  • 27 Old Deal (p. 335)
  • 28 Freedom Brand (p. 349)
  • 29 Massive Resistance (p. 365)
  • Part V Angela Davis
  • 30 The Act of Civil Rights (p. 381)
  • 31 Black Power (p. 393)
  • 32 Law and Order (p. 410)
  • 33 Reagan's Drugs (p. 424)
  • 34 New Democrats (p. 440)
  • 35 New Republicans (p. 456)
  • 36 99.9 Percent the Same (p. 469)
  • 37 The Extraordinary Negro (p. 482)
  • Epilogue (p. 497)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 513)
  • Notes (p. 516)
  • Index (p. 562)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

An accomplished history of racist thought and practice in the United States from the Puritans to the present. Anyone who thought that the 2008 election of President Barack Obama marked the emergence of post-racial America has been sorely disillusioned in the subsequent years with seemingly daily reminders of the schism wrought by racism and white supremacy. And yet anyone with even a cursory understanding of this country's tortured history with race should have known better. In this tour de force, Kendi (African-American History/Univ. of Florida; The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972, 2012) explores the history of racist ideasand their connection with racist practicesacross American history. The author uses five main individuals as "tour guides" to investigate the development of racist ideas throughout the history of the U.S.: the preacher and intellectual Cotton Mather, Founding Father Thomas Jefferson, ardent abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, scholar W.E.B. Du Bois, and activist Angela Davis. Kendi also poses three broad schools of thought regarding racial matters throughout American history: segregationist, assimilationist, and anti-racist. Although this trio can be reductionist, it provides a solid framework for understanding the interplay between racist ideas, anti-racism, and the attempts to synthesize them"assimilationism," which the author ultimately identifies as simply another form of racism, even when advocated by African-Americans. The subtitle of the book promises a "definitive history," but despite the book's more than 500 pages of text, its structure and its viewing of racial ideas through the lens of five individuals means that it is almost necessarily episodic. Although it is a fine history, the narrative may best be read as an extended, sophisticated, and sometimes (justifiably) angry essay. Racism is the enduring scar on the American consciousness. In this ambitious, magisterial book, Kendi reveals just how deep that scar cuts and why it endures, its barely subcutaneous pain still able to flare. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
Phillipsburg Free Public Library
200 Broubalow Way
Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
(908)-454-3712
www.pburglib.org

Powered by Koha