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All-American Muslim girl / Nadine Jolie Courtney.

By: Courtney, Nadine Jolie, 1980-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019Description: 419 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780374309527 :; 0374309523.Subject(s): Arab Americans -- Fiction | Muslims -- Fiction | Families -- Fiction | Prejudices -- Fiction | Identity (Psychology) -- Fiction | Self-realization -- Fiction | Dating (Social customs) -- Fiction | Islam -- Customs and practices -- FictionDDC classification: [Fic] Summary: Sixteen-year-old Allie, aged seven when she knew her family was different and feared, struggles to claim her Muslim and Arabic heritage while finding her place as an American teenager.
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Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Young Adult Fiction Teen Spot YA COU Available 36748002463737
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A Kirkus Best Book of 2019

Nadine Jolie Courtney's All-American Muslim Girl is a relevant, relatable story of being caught between two worlds, and the struggles and hard-won joys of finding your place.

Allie Abraham has it all going for her--she's a straight-A student, with good friends and a close-knit family, and she's dating popular, sweet Wells Henderson. One problem: Wells's father is Jack Henderson, America's most famous conservative shock jock, and Allie hasn't told Wells that her family is Muslim. It's not like Allie's religion is a secret. It's just that her parents don't practice, and raised her to keep it to herself.

But as Allie witnesses Islamophobia in her small town and across the nation, she decides to embrace her faith--study, practice it, and even face misunderstanding for it. Who is Allie, if she sheds the façade of the "perfect" all-American girl?

Sixteen-year-old Allie, aged seven when she knew her family was different and feared, struggles to claim her Muslim and Arabic heritage while finding her place as an American teenager.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

Allie Abraham is tired of being a "receptacle for unguarded Just Between Us White People ignorance" and discomfort.Moving from place to place with her Circassian Jordanian professor father and white American psychologist mother, Allie has been a chameleon, blending in as the perfect all-American girl. Very few people know that Allie is actually Alia and that both her parents are Muslim. Her mother converted upon marrying her no-longer-practicing father, who encourages his daughter to take advantage of the pale skin and reddish-blonde hair that help her avoid being profiled. Allie yearns to connect to her religion and heritageand to her Teta, the grandmother with whom she is only able to communicate in broken Arabic. Her new boyfriend, Wells Henderson, seems so genuine and likable, unlike his father, a conservative, xenophobic cable newscaster. As Allie embraces all the parts of who she is and confronts Islamophobia, she wonders if others can fully accept her growth. The book handles the complexity and intersectionality of being a Muslim American woman with finesse, addressing many aspects of identity and Islamic opinions. Allie, who has a highly diverse friend group, examines her white-passing privilege and race as well as multiple levels of discrimination, perceptions of conversion, feminism, sexual identity, and sexuality. While grounded in the American Muslim experience, the book has universal appeal thanks to its nuanced, well-developed teen characters whose struggles offer direct parallels to many other communities.Phenomenal. (Fiction. 13-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
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