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An indigenous peoples' history of the United States for young people / Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz ; adapted by Jean Mendoza and Debbie Reese.

By: Mendoza, Jean.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boston, Massachusetts : Beacon Press, [2019]Copyright date: ©2019Description: ix, 270 pages : illustrations, maps ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780807049396; 0807049395.Related works: Adaptation of (work): Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne, 1938- Indigenous peoples' history of the United States.Subject(s): Indians of North America -- Historiography | Indians, Treatment of -- United States -- History | Indians of North America -- Colonization | Indians -- Treatment -- History | United States -- Colonization | United States -- Race relations | United States -- Politics and government | United States -- Colonization | United States -- Race relations
Contents:
Introduction: This land -- Follow the corn -- Culture of conquest -- Cult of the covenant -- Bloody footprints -- The birth of a nation -- Jefferson, Jackson, and the pursuit of indigenous homelands -- Sea to shining sea -- Indigenous lands become "Indian country" -- The persistence of sovereignty -- Indigenous action, indigenous rights -- "Water is life": indigenous resistance in the twenty-first century.
Summary: "Going beyond the story of America as a country "discovered" by a few brave men in the "New World," Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Young Adult Non-Fiction Teen Spot YA 970.004 MEN Available 36748002463232
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

2020 American Indian Youth Literature Young Adult Honor Book

2020 Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People ,selected by National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and the Children's Book Council


2019 Best-Of Lists: Best YA Nonfiction of 2019 ( Kirkus Reviews ) · Best Nonfiction of 2019 ( School Library Journal ) · Best Books for Teens (New York Public Library) · Best Informational Books for Older Readers (Chicago Public Library)
Spanning more than 400 years, this classic bottom-up history examines the legacy of Indigenous peoples' resistance, resilience, and steadfast fight against imperialism.

Going beyond the story of America as a country "discovered" by a few brave men in the "New World," Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity.

The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: This land -- Follow the corn -- Culture of conquest -- Cult of the covenant -- Bloody footprints -- The birth of a nation -- Jefferson, Jackson, and the pursuit of indigenous homelands -- Sea to shining sea -- Indigenous lands become "Indian country" -- The persistence of sovereignty -- Indigenous action, indigenous rights -- "Water is life": indigenous resistance in the twenty-first century.

"Going beyond the story of America as a country "discovered" by a few brave men in the "New World," Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history"-- Provided by publisher.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • A Note to Readers (p. vii)
  • Introduction This Land (p. 1)
  • Chapter 1 Follow the Corn (p. 17)
  • Chapter 2 Culture of Conquest (p. 32)
  • Chapter 3 Cult of the Covenant (p. 47)
  • Chapter 4 Bloody Footprints (p. 62)
  • Chapter 5 The Birth of a Nation (p. 88)
  • Chapter 6 Jefferson, Jackson, and the Pursuit of Indigenous Homelands (p. 106)
  • Chapter 7 Sea to Shining Sea (p. 122)
  • Chapter 8 Indigenous Lands Become "Indian Country" (p. 137)
  • Chapter 9 The Persistence of Sovereignty (p. 157)
  • Chapter 10 Indigenous Action, Indigenous Rights (p. 176)
  • Conclusion "Water Is Life": Indigenous Resistance in the Twenty-First Century (p. 202)
  • For Further Reading (p. 229)
  • Some Books We Recommend (p. 231)
  • Notes (p. 235)
  • Image Credits (p. 242)
  • Index (p. 245)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

A young readers' adaptation of the groundbreaking 2014 work, An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, offering an important corrective to conventional narratives of our nation's history.Questioning the ideologies behind the belief systems that gave birth to America's dominant origin stories, this book not only challenges the standard tale of European explorers "discovering" America, it provides an Indigenous perspective on key events. The book urges students to think critically about private property and extractive industries, land conservation and environmental rights, social activism, the definition of what it means to be "civilized," and the role of the media in shaping perceptions. With an eye to the diversity and number of Indigenous nations in America, the volume untangles the many conquerors and victims of the early colonization era and beyond. From the arrival of the first Europeans through to the 21st century, the work tackles subjects as diverse as the Dakota 38, the Ghost Dance and Wounded Knee, the American Indian Movement's takeover of Alcatraz, and the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance. A deeply felt connection to the Earth's health permeates the text, along with the strength and resiliency that have kept Indigenous cultures alive. Maps, photographs, informative sidebars, points for discussion, and a recommended book list round out this accessible, engaging, and necessary addition to school libraries and classrooms.An excellent read, dismantling American mythologies and fostering critical reasoning about history and current events. (further reading, recommended titles, notes, image credits, index) (Nonfiction. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
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