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The woman in the window / A.J. Finn.

By: Finn, A. J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : William Morrow, 2018Edition: First edition.Description: 427 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780062678416; 0062678418.Subject(s): Recluses -- New York (State) -- New York -- Fiction | Families -- New York (State) -- New York -- FictionGenre/Form: Fiction. | Thrillers (Fiction)Summary: "It isn't paranoia if it's really happening ... Anna Fox lives alone -- a recluse in her New York City home, drinking too much wine, watching old movies ... and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move next door: a father, a mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble -- and its shocking secrets are laid bare. What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this gripping Hitchcockian thriller, no one and nothing are what they seem."-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction New Books FIC FINN Available 36748002394924
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction New Books FIC FINN Available 36748002391763
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction New Books FIC FINN Checked out 07/06/2019 36748002391706
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction New Books FIC FINN Withdrawn 36748002385781
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Instant #1 New York Times Bestseller!

"Astounding. Thrilling. Amazing." --Gillian Flynn

"Unputdownable." --Stephen King

"A dark, twisty confection." --Ruth Ware

"Absolutely gripping." --Louise Penny

For readers of Gillian Flynn and Tana French comes one of the decade's most anticipated debuts, to be published in thirty-six languages around the world and already in development as a major film from Fox: a twisty, powerful Hitchcockian thriller about an agoraphobic woman who believes she witnessed a crime in a neighboring house.

It isn't paranoia if it's really happening . . .

Anna Fox lives alone--a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble--and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one--and nothing--is what it seems.

Twisty and powerful, ingenious and moving, The Woman in the Window is a smart, sophisticated novel of psychological suspense that recalls the best of Hitchcock.

"It isn't paranoia if it's really happening ... Anna Fox lives alone -- a recluse in her New York City home, drinking too much wine, watching old movies ... and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move next door: a father, a mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble -- and its shocking secrets are laid bare. What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this gripping Hitchcockian thriller, no one and nothing are what they seem."-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

A lonely woman in New York spends her days guzzling merlot, popping pills, and spying on the neighborsuntil something she sees sucks her into a vortex of terror."The Miller home across the streetabandon hope, all ye who enter hereis one of five townhouses that I can survey from the south-facing windows of my own." A new family is moving in on her Harlem street, and Dr. Anna Fox already knows their names, employment histories, how much they paid for their house, and anything else you can find out using a search engine. Following a mysterious accident, Anna is suffering from agoraphobia so severe that she hasn't left her house in months. She speaks to her husband and daughter on the phonethey've moved out because "the doctors say too much contact isn't healthy"and conducts her relationships with her neighbors wholly through the zoom lens of her Nikon D5500. As she explains to fellow sufferers in her online support group, food and medication (not to mention cases of wine) can be delivered to your door; your housecleaner can take out the trash. Anna's psychiatrist and physical therapist make house calls; a tenant in her basement pinch-hits as a handyman. To fight boredom, she's got online chess and a huge collection of DVDs; she has most of Hitchcock memorized. Both the game of chess and noir movie plotsRear Window, in particularwill become spookily apt metaphors for the events that unfold when the teenage son of her new neighbors knocks on her door to deliver a gift from his mother. Not long after, his mother herself shows upand then Anna witnesses something almost too shocking to be real happening in their living room. Boredom won't be a problem any longer.Crackling with tension, and the sound of pages turning, as twist after twist sweeps away each hypothesis you come up with about what happened in Anna's past and what fresh hell is unfolding now. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

New York Times Book Review

A damsel in distress can be a poor narrator. How to convey the magnitude of her troubles without letting her descend into irritating selfpity? Finn tackles this contradiction brilliantly, especially given his agoraphobic heroine's situation. Anna Fox is confiding and breezy, but not brittle. The conversations presented here as amusing really do amuse. Yet the fear is always there. Anna, a gentrifier in Harlem, spends a lot of time watching old movies and looking out her window. Separated by her illness from her husband and daughter, she's alone nearly all the time. But since she's a trained psychologist, she has eased into helping fellow sufferers online. Perky with her clients, she's less so in her asides to the reader, especially when she's rattling off the names of all the pills she adds to her incessant wine drinking. Eventually, Anna trains her professionally keen attention on some of her neighbors, members of a family that has moved into a townhouse across the way. As, one by one, they start to visit her, disturbingly different versions of their lives are on offer. Sometimes "The Woman in the Window" seems like a freshly warped version of an old mystery play, with its repeated entrances and exits on a single stage. Late at night, awash in pills and alcohol, Anna is sure she has seen a stabbing. Finn signals a key development ahead of time, but that doesn't soften the punch when it comes. Plenty of revelations ensue, and as they pile up the reader feels them right along with Anna.
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