And still I rise : black America since MLK : an illustrated chronology / Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Kevin M. Burke.

By: Gates, Henry Louis, Jr
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Ecco, 2015Description: xiii, 321 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 26 cmISBN: 9780062427007; 0062427008Subject(s): African Americans -- Social conditions -- 1975- | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 305.896073 Summary: "The companion book to Henry Louis Gates, Jr.'s PBS series, And Still I Rise--a timeline and chronicle of the past fifty years of black history in the U.S. in more than 350 photos" -- provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Confronting Racism in America
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Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Non-Fiction Adult Non-Fiction 305.896073 GAT Available 36748002261446
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>The companion book to Henry Louis Gates, Jr.'s PBS series, And Still I Rise--a timeline and chronicle of the past fifty years of black history in the U.S. in more than 350 photos.</p> <p>Beginning with the assassination of Malcolm X in February 1965, And Still I Rise: From Black Power to the White House explores the last half-century of the African American experience. More than fifty years after the passage of the Civil Rights Act and the birth of Black Power, the United States has both a black president and black CEOs running Fortune 500 companies--and a large black underclass beset by persistent poverty, inadequate education, and an epidemic of incarceration. Harvard professor and scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. raises disturbing and vital questions about this dichotomy. How did the African American community end up encompassing such profound contradictions? And what will "the black community" mean tomorrow?</p> <p>Gates takes readers through the major historical events and untold stories of the sixty years that have irrevocably shaped both the African American experience and the nation as a whole, from the explosive social and political changes of the 1960s, into the 1970s and 1980s--eras characterized by both prosperity and neglect--through the turn of the century to today, taking measure of such racial flashpoints as the Tawana Brawley case, OJ Simpson's murder trial, the murders of Amadou Diallo and Trayvon Martin, and debates around the NYPD's "stop and frisk" policies. Even as it surveys the political and social evolution of black America, And Still I Rise is also a celebration of the accomplishments of black artists, musicians, writers, comedians, and thinkers who have helped to define American popular culture and to change our world.</p>

"The companion book to Henry Louis Gates, Jr.'s PBS series, And Still I Rise--a timeline and chronicle of the past fifty years of black history in the U.S. in more than 350 photos" -- provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

A stirring chronology of advancesand some backward stepsin the long struggle for African-American civil rights. The subtitle is a touch imprecise, for Martin Luther King is still alive at the beginning of Gates (African-American Studies/Harvard Univ.; Finding Your Roots, 2014, etc.) and Burke's compendium, a companion to the forthcoming PBS series. It is Malcolm X, instead, who falls just two pages in, a victim of an internal struggle within the Black Muslim movement. As the authors observe, his memoir soon became "a canonical text for the Black Power movement," selling 6 million copies within 10 years. Ten days after Malcolm's funeral, hundreds of civil rights marchers were beaten in Selma, Alabama, launching King's march to Montgomery and affirming the commitment of the Lyndon Johnson administration to civil rights at the federal level. Two dozen pages in, and King has fallen as well, killed at the age of 39, "the same age Malcolm X was when he was assassinated three years prior." The year 1968 would mark much upheaval, symbolized by medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos' raising of the Black Power salute at the Mexico City Olympics. Gates and Burke chart political and social events alongside the incalculable influence of black culture on mainstream American culture, from Broadway (James Earl Jones, "long before he is known as the voice of Darth Vader," won a Tony in 1969) to music ("Although most of the audience is white, African American performers star at the three-day Woodstock music festival in upstate New York") to sports and science, the latter represented most visibly by the immensely popular interpreter of cosmology Neil deGrasse Tyson. Presented in accessible entries seldom exceeding 100 words, the chronology is richly illustrated with images both iconic and seldom seen, making this especially useful as a visual reference for readers too young to have scenes from the early years burned into their memories. A must for the look-it-up shelf and a poignant reminder of how far we have comeand have yet to go. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
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