The time keeper / Mitch Albom.

By: Albom, Mitch, 1958-
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Hyperion, c2012Edition: 1st edDescription: 224 p. ; 20 cmISBN: 9781401322786 :Subject(s): Time -- FictionGenre/Form: Fantasy fictionDDC classification: 813/.6
List(s) this item appears in: PHS - 10
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Item type Current location Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction PHS Reading List FIC ALB Available 36748002248351
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
YA Paperback PHS Reading List YA PB FICTION A Available 36748002236927
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction PHS Reading List FIC ALB Available 36748002180331
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction PHS Reading List FIC ALB Available 36748002119834
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction PHS Reading List FIC ALB Available 36748002075796
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction PHS Reading List FIC ALB Available 36748002075739
Adult Book Phillipsburg Free Public Library
Adult Fiction PHS Reading List FIC ALB Available 36748002143263
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the author who's inspired millions worldwide with books like Tuesdays with Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven comes his most imaginative novel yet, The Time Keeper --a compelling fable about the first man on Earth to count the hours.<br> <br> The man who became Father Time. <br> <br> In Mitch Albom's exceptional work of fiction, the inventor of the world's first clock is punished for trying to measure God's greatest gift. He is banished to a cave for centuries and forced to listen to the voices of all who come after him seeking more days, more years.<br> <br> Eventually, with his soul nearly broken, Father Time is granted his freedom, along with a magical hourglass and a mission: a chance to redeem himself by teaching two earthly people the true meaning of time.<br> <br> He returns to our world--now dominated by the hour-counting he so innocently began--and commences a journey with two unlikely partners: one a teenage girl who is about to give up on life, the other a wealthy old businessman who wants to live forever. To save himself, he must save them both. And stop the world to do so.<br> <br> Told in Albom's signature spare, evocative prose, this remarkably original tale will inspire readers everywhere to reconsider their own notions of time, how they spend it, and how precious it truly is.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

Treacly fable by pop inspirationalist Albom (Tuesdays with Morrie, 1997, etc.). Dava Sobel and Longitude be damned, God doesn't like people who measure things. Six thousandodd years ago--is the date a nod to Archbishop Ussher and his proto-creationism?--a fine young fellow named Dor invents the world's first clock and is banished to a cave for the affront, since only the deity is supposed to be concerned with such things, it being the days before hourly wage work and lawyers who bill in 15-minute increments. Dor now sits in a cave, "listening to something. Voices. Endless voices." And what do you suppose those voices want? Yup, time. More of it. Endless time. Or at least a year or two. Writing in his customary staccato ("But Father Time is real. And, in truth, he cannot age."), Albom gives Dor a chance to redeem himself by instructing two hapless earthlings--a man dying of cancer, a teenage girl in danger of dying by her own hand--in the meaning of life. The Little Prince it ain't: Albom seems to have taken the template for his novel from a corporate report, each page studded with boldfaced passages that would seem to signal something momentous; a person in a hurry could well read just those boldfaced passages and emerge with a pretty good idea of the storyline, which is plenty predictable in any event. Still, there are a few useful takeaways, among them these: If you're moribund, a pocket watch will cheer you right up; if you're worried about the prospect of imminent demise, then remember that, as the old dude who cometh from God's side sayeth, immortality "is not a gift." A product less than a book; those with not enough time on their hands might spend what they have more meaningfully elsewhere.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
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